• Sunrise

    Loving Ourselves to Total Wellness

Free self help e-book in Napa

Get my FREE e-Book

"3 Easy Ways to Improve Your Health Today"
by Patty Morell Bilhartz, M.D., M.P.H.

SIGN UP AND RECEIVE MY FREE E-BOOK TODAY!

  • Home
  • Newsletter Sign Up

The #1 Life-Changing Secret that Children Know Better than Adults

IMG_2184-e1429315506218-225x300

“Life is what happens while you’re busy making other plans.”   John Lennon

Welcome to the World of “Chaortic”! You may have never heard of the word “chaortic.” Actually, it is a word. Sort of. Unword.com defines it as: “(adj.) A situation that is both orderly and chaotic.”

I actually love this word. How better to describe our lives on this earth? Order in the midst of chaos; chaos in the midst of order. Life as it was meant to be. The “Full Catastrophe” in its highest form of serendipity!

The child in my blog picture is my youngest grandson who is 18 months old. His life is a definition of “chaortic” in its highest sense. You can see in the expression on his face the pride he feels as he has figured out yet another way to bring chaos into order. Or, is it order into chaos?

He lives in the ecstasy of the moment in this picture. Sometimes, it’s the agony of the moment. But, in any moment, he is right in the middle of it, experiencing the moment in its fullness.

The #1 secret that he seems to know better than I do is that loving the moment is where it’s at.

Why is that so hard for adults to do? And, what’s so important about relishing the moment that makes me want to blog about it?

For starters, when we can release the past with thankfulness and forgiveness, and let go of the future with trust and faith, we discover our true authenticity. We experience deep gratitude, sacrificial love, and amazing bliss. Right here, right now, in the moment. We can’t miss it when we are focused on it.

Life is a gift, one step at a time. More than that clouds our mind with needless worries and too many regrets.

Sometimes, when we are savoring the moment, we can even “hear the bell” as did the unnamed boy in Van Allsburg’s The Polar Express. Because of his faith, he was able to experience a spectacular layer of life that others missed because of their lack of belief.

Just yesterday, I was walking to the park with my grandson. I had a destination in mind: the park. Not him. He had the moment in mind only. No destination. No goal to get somewhere. He was thoroughly immersed in the moment. I began to notice that his jubilation trumped mine. Why was that? Was I so focused on getting to the park that I was missing out on the journey there?

As we walked and I began to watch him in his elation, I began to delight in the moment more fully as well. A butterfly; a bee. A ladybug; a bird.   A dog; two cats. Several trucks; a few cars. One motorcycle; an airplane. The postal worker; a child on a scooter. A gorgeous day with just the right amount of breeze and sun.

What a day! And, I almost missed it by being overly focused on a future event.   I forgot to revel in the perfection of life as it was in that split second.

Apparently that is what the monk Brother Andrew did. http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/498641.The_Practice_of_the_Presence_of_God

He saw the face of God in every ordinary moment–washing dishes, sweeping floors, making beds–and those moments were transformed.

I’m trying to let my grandson lead the way for me. I’m attempting to be more thankful as I’m folding laundry, more grateful as I clean the kitchen, more focused as I drive the car, and more aware as I listen to friends and family. Is the real goal to fold the laundry, or feel the fabrics and smell the scents as its being folded? Is the true purpose to get to where I’m going, or to meditate on the presence of God as I drive?  When I love the moment that is–even in its ordinariness–that moment is transfigured to a blessed event

I’ll admit. I’m not very good at this yet, but I have set the intention to become more mindful. I don’t want to miss any moment of my Spirit-given life.

Let’s join the children of the world in their secret. Maybe one day we will be as good at loving the moment as they are. And, the world will be a better place when we do, because we will be better for the world.

  What does loving the moment mean to you? We welcome your comments and discussion.    

Comments (5)

  • Avatar

    Teri

    |

    Such a true reminder of making the most of each moment that we are given in this life. The innocence of childhood is to be envied!

    Reply

    • Avatar

      Patty Bilhartz

      |

      Children have amazing hearts, for sure!

      Reply

  • Avatar

    Leslie

    |

    When friends hear that I live in Normandy France, they say, “wow, can’t beat that for beauty and history,” or they ask, “is it hard to live in a different country and culture?” I have it say it is yes and no. I struggle with SADD and Normandy in winter can be a very depressing four months and it is so easy to wish I were anywhere but here. Now that spring has arrived, those thoughts are far away but by wishing I was somewhere else for those months I didn’t really live with in a state of appreciation and awareness of the wonder of each day.
    So while it’s beautiful weather and easy to be positive, I now have the opportunity to do as Patty did along the walk to the park, practice affirming and appreciating each moment and to get it so ingrained in my nature that it will carry me through next winter!

    Reply

    • Avatar

      Patty Bilhartz

      |

      These are such beautiful words. Thanks for sharing.

      Reply

  • Avatar

    Nancy

    |

    Love the photo of Carson! And you are right about chaos & orderliness in a child’s life. Children need/like meals, snacks, bedtime, playtime to follow a routine & to take place at roughly the same time everyday. Yet children also love to play in chaos – i.e. dump out all of the toys/blocks/pots & pans, etc. They need/like a structured routine, but they also enjoy playtime chaos. Thank you for sharing Patty. Fondly, Nancy

    Reply

Leave a comment